Fringe Moments

Celebrating 75 years of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe

The following pictures and stories have been submitted by Fringe artists and audience members to mark the 75th anniversary of this wonderful festival.

Some submissions have been lightly edited for clarity.

"I first discovered street performing at the Edinburgh Fringe. I was there for the first Fringe Sunday in 1981 and that’s where I first saw a street band called Pookiesnackenburger (from whom Steve McNicholas and Luke Cresswell later became STOMP) who played huge gigs on the street. That got me interested in street performing.

Then in 1982 they did this hugely popular show called Lunchtime at Mr Cairo’s at 1pm. Me and my friends went almost every day to see it. They definitely had the ‘it’ thing. Everyone was coming, everyone liked it – you never knew what was going to happen next and it had a magical quality about it. I realised then I had to develop that quality.

Seven years later, in 1989, I had an experience that made me feel I had finally achieved it. I was street performing on the Mound in Edinburgh and I had set up my street performing equipment as usual (animal tea cosies, manacles, 5ft unicycle – I was doing an escape act on top of a tall unicycle). I started performing in my usual fashion – performing as if they was a large invisible audience in front of me. I would just talk even if no-one was there.

Then, as I was improvising away, this man who had noticed me cried out, ‘Oh!’ and then just ran away, off down the Mound towards Princes Street. I thought, well that's an odd thing to do – someone just running away from a show. But then about a minute later, he came back, dragging his wife and two children, who he plonked down in front of the show. I realised then that he must have seen me before and was insisting that his family watch what I did because he thought my show was going to be unusual.

Later I realised this implied that I was doing something different and intriguing and maybe I was going to make it after all. That was my eighth Edinburgh. It took me eight Edinburgh Fringes to finally arrive!"

Eddie Izzard

An image of Peter Straker singing passionately into a microphone

Peter Straker (photo by Tao Zhu), (c) Kevin Short, 2012. "A brilliant memory, one of many at the festival, was one night in August 2012 when we frantically brought together a film crew, a sound crew and a whole lot more in an attempt to capture Peter Straker and his band performing their brilliant tribute to Jacques Brel at Assembly's Rainy Hall venue on the Mound. With a packed house and the tight turnarounds it was a miracle everyone was in position in time, just!"

Peter Straker (photo by Tao Zhu), (c) Kevin Short, 2012. "A brilliant memory, one of many at the festival, was one night in August 2012 when we frantically brought together a film crew, a sound crew and a whole lot more in an attempt to capture Peter Straker and his band performing their brilliant tribute to Jacques Brel at Assembly's Rainy Hall venue on the Mound. With a packed house and the tight turnarounds it was a miracle everyone was in position in time, just!"

A person dressed as a bottle of tequila stands next to a clown who is speaking into a microphone.

(c) Pauline Frear, 2015. "We’ve been coming to the Fringe since the late 90s and over the years, have amassed many ‘standout’ moments. My favourite is probably when I ended up as a bottle of tequila at Puddles' Pity Party in 2015. Having been singled out as his latest victim, Puddles led me to the stage, dropped a rather heavy costume over my head and proceeded to serenade me in Spanish as the audience howled with laughter. The problem was, I had no idea what I was supposed to be! The costume kept falling over my eyes, so all I could make out was a bit of yellow and red. I was relieved when the song came to an end and eagerly waited to be set free. But it wasn’t meant to be – I was made to walk back to my seat in full costume, which is how I had to stay for the rest of the show. It was then, still unsure of what I actually was, that I turned to my husband and whispered, 'Howard, am I a chicken?!'"

(c) Pauline Frear, 2015. "We’ve been coming to the Fringe since the late 90s and over the years, have amassed many ‘standout’ moments. My favourite is probably when I ended up as a bottle of tequila at Puddles' Pity Party in 2015. Having been singled out as his latest victim, Puddles led me to the stage, dropped a rather heavy costume over my head and proceeded to serenade me in Spanish as the audience howled with laughter. The problem was, I had no idea what I was supposed to be! The costume kept falling over my eyes, so all I could make out was a bit of yellow and red. I was relieved when the song came to an end and eagerly waited to be set free. But it wasn’t meant to be – I was made to walk back to my seat in full costume, which is how I had to stay for the rest of the show. It was then, still unsure of what I actually was, that I turned to my husband and whispered, 'Howard, am I a chicken?!'"

A man in sunglasses stands in front of some Fringe posters holding a large keyboard.

(c) Andrew Fingret. "Mum died in 2010 leaving no remaining family save my sister, her kids and me. Or so we believed. Six weeks later I am invited to the Fringe. Never been before. I pre-booked everything for the time I was going to be there but, arriving an evening early, I opportunistically browsed the brochure of 3,500 shows. It opened on a page with a show called Jewish Chronicles, which had a glowing endorsement from Alan Bennett describing Daniel Cainer as a 'singing Leeds Jewish Bunuel'. Despite that, I decided to go. Within minutes I had laughed and cried, and not just because I was vulnerable; I was feeling a connection, and not just because I was looking for one; by the end I felt we were related, and not just because I believe family should be built on a 'one out, one in' basis. After the show I talked to Daniel about it, bought a CD and signed up to his mailing list. When I received an email to the list a few weeks later I replied, repeating my family theory. A response from his father followed a few days later: 'Dear cousin...' Attached was OUR family tree. My Mum’s mum and Daniel’s dad’s mum were first cousins. It doesn’t sound close but on the tree, my family and Daniel’s sailed down on a parallel, almost touching streams, and at the bottom of our stream was a picture of my mum as a little girl. Thanks to the Fringe Daniel and I have become 'brothers' and Edinburgh has been our August playground ever since."

(c) Andrew Fingret. "Mum died in 2010 leaving no remaining family save my sister, her kids and me. Or so we believed. Six weeks later I am invited to the Fringe. Never been before. I pre-booked everything for the time I was going to be there but, arriving an evening early, I opportunistically browsed the brochure of 3,500 shows. It opened on a page with a show called Jewish Chronicles, which had a glowing endorsement from Alan Bennett describing Daniel Cainer as a 'singing Leeds Jewish Bunuel'. Despite that, I decided to go. Within minutes I had laughed and cried, and not just because I was vulnerable; I was feeling a connection, and not just because I was looking for one; by the end I felt we were related, and not just because I believe family should be built on a 'one out, one in' basis. After the show I talked to Daniel about it, bought a CD and signed up to his mailing list. When I received an email to the list a few weeks later I replied, repeating my family theory. A response from his father followed a few days later: 'Dear cousin...' Attached was OUR family tree. My Mum’s mum and Daniel’s dad’s mum were first cousins. It doesn’t sound close but on the tree, my family and Daniel’s sailed down on a parallel, almost touching streams, and at the bottom of our stream was a picture of my mum as a little girl. Thanks to the Fringe Daniel and I have become 'brothers' and Edinburgh has been our August playground ever since."

Two young people sit on a large green chair holding a purple umbrella.

(c) John Crawley. "The city bursts with colour from venue names, banners and decoration of public areas."

(c) John Crawley. "The city bursts with colour from venue names, banners and decoration of public areas."

A woman in a sparkly costume smiles at the camera and holds up a flyer.

(c) Bob Husson, 2019. "This photo, taken in 2019, shows me the spirit of the Fringe, the dedicated flyerer."

(c) Bob Husson, 2019. "This photo, taken in 2019, shows me the spirit of the Fringe, the dedicated flyerer."

Item 1 of 6
An image of Peter Straker singing passionately into a microphone

Peter Straker (photo by Tao Zhu), (c) Kevin Short, 2012. "A brilliant memory, one of many at the festival, was one night in August 2012 when we frantically brought together a film crew, a sound crew and a whole lot more in an attempt to capture Peter Straker and his band performing their brilliant tribute to Jacques Brel at Assembly's Rainy Hall venue on the Mound. With a packed house and the tight turnarounds it was a miracle everyone was in position in time, just!"

Peter Straker (photo by Tao Zhu), (c) Kevin Short, 2012. "A brilliant memory, one of many at the festival, was one night in August 2012 when we frantically brought together a film crew, a sound crew and a whole lot more in an attempt to capture Peter Straker and his band performing their brilliant tribute to Jacques Brel at Assembly's Rainy Hall venue on the Mound. With a packed house and the tight turnarounds it was a miracle everyone was in position in time, just!"

A person dressed as a bottle of tequila stands next to a clown who is speaking into a microphone.

(c) Pauline Frear, 2015. "We’ve been coming to the Fringe since the late 90s and over the years, have amassed many ‘standout’ moments. My favourite is probably when I ended up as a bottle of tequila at Puddles' Pity Party in 2015. Having been singled out as his latest victim, Puddles led me to the stage, dropped a rather heavy costume over my head and proceeded to serenade me in Spanish as the audience howled with laughter. The problem was, I had no idea what I was supposed to be! The costume kept falling over my eyes, so all I could make out was a bit of yellow and red. I was relieved when the song came to an end and eagerly waited to be set free. But it wasn’t meant to be – I was made to walk back to my seat in full costume, which is how I had to stay for the rest of the show. It was then, still unsure of what I actually was, that I turned to my husband and whispered, 'Howard, am I a chicken?!'"

(c) Pauline Frear, 2015. "We’ve been coming to the Fringe since the late 90s and over the years, have amassed many ‘standout’ moments. My favourite is probably when I ended up as a bottle of tequila at Puddles' Pity Party in 2015. Having been singled out as his latest victim, Puddles led me to the stage, dropped a rather heavy costume over my head and proceeded to serenade me in Spanish as the audience howled with laughter. The problem was, I had no idea what I was supposed to be! The costume kept falling over my eyes, so all I could make out was a bit of yellow and red. I was relieved when the song came to an end and eagerly waited to be set free. But it wasn’t meant to be – I was made to walk back to my seat in full costume, which is how I had to stay for the rest of the show. It was then, still unsure of what I actually was, that I turned to my husband and whispered, 'Howard, am I a chicken?!'"

A man in sunglasses stands in front of some Fringe posters holding a large keyboard.

(c) Andrew Fingret. "Mum died in 2010 leaving no remaining family save my sister, her kids and me. Or so we believed. Six weeks later I am invited to the Fringe. Never been before. I pre-booked everything for the time I was going to be there but, arriving an evening early, I opportunistically browsed the brochure of 3,500 shows. It opened on a page with a show called Jewish Chronicles, which had a glowing endorsement from Alan Bennett describing Daniel Cainer as a 'singing Leeds Jewish Bunuel'. Despite that, I decided to go. Within minutes I had laughed and cried, and not just because I was vulnerable; I was feeling a connection, and not just because I was looking for one; by the end I felt we were related, and not just because I believe family should be built on a 'one out, one in' basis. After the show I talked to Daniel about it, bought a CD and signed up to his mailing list. When I received an email to the list a few weeks later I replied, repeating my family theory. A response from his father followed a few days later: 'Dear cousin...' Attached was OUR family tree. My Mum’s mum and Daniel’s dad’s mum were first cousins. It doesn’t sound close but on the tree, my family and Daniel’s sailed down on a parallel, almost touching streams, and at the bottom of our stream was a picture of my mum as a little girl. Thanks to the Fringe Daniel and I have become 'brothers' and Edinburgh has been our August playground ever since."

(c) Andrew Fingret. "Mum died in 2010 leaving no remaining family save my sister, her kids and me. Or so we believed. Six weeks later I am invited to the Fringe. Never been before. I pre-booked everything for the time I was going to be there but, arriving an evening early, I opportunistically browsed the brochure of 3,500 shows. It opened on a page with a show called Jewish Chronicles, which had a glowing endorsement from Alan Bennett describing Daniel Cainer as a 'singing Leeds Jewish Bunuel'. Despite that, I decided to go. Within minutes I had laughed and cried, and not just because I was vulnerable; I was feeling a connection, and not just because I was looking for one; by the end I felt we were related, and not just because I believe family should be built on a 'one out, one in' basis. After the show I talked to Daniel about it, bought a CD and signed up to his mailing list. When I received an email to the list a few weeks later I replied, repeating my family theory. A response from his father followed a few days later: 'Dear cousin...' Attached was OUR family tree. My Mum’s mum and Daniel’s dad’s mum were first cousins. It doesn’t sound close but on the tree, my family and Daniel’s sailed down on a parallel, almost touching streams, and at the bottom of our stream was a picture of my mum as a little girl. Thanks to the Fringe Daniel and I have become 'brothers' and Edinburgh has been our August playground ever since."

Two young people sit on a large green chair holding a purple umbrella.

(c) John Crawley. "The city bursts with colour from venue names, banners and decoration of public areas."

(c) John Crawley. "The city bursts with colour from venue names, banners and decoration of public areas."

A woman in a sparkly costume smiles at the camera and holds up a flyer.

(c) Bob Husson, 2019. "This photo, taken in 2019, shows me the spirit of the Fringe, the dedicated flyerer."

(c) Bob Husson, 2019. "This photo, taken in 2019, shows me the spirit of the Fringe, the dedicated flyerer."

The Fringe atmosphere

"I love the unexpected, the chaos, the anarchy of the Fringe. Trying to find your way through the programme knowing that while you'll see excellent shows, you'll always miss other great ones; talking to strangers while queuing up about their favourite performances so far, and sharing yours; watching the audience and actors mix at the Traverse bar or in the Summerhall courtyard; getting a culture infusion which resonates for a long time. All of this with the dramatic and incredibly beautiful backdrop that is Edinburgh, a perfect place for the festival."

Uta Bretsch

"It all started in 1986 when our university took a performance to the Fringe which I had organised and co-directed. Ten of us performed in a church hall at 11am every day for a week and spent more money watching everyone else, including Rowan Atkinson in his one-man show and Metamorphosis with Tim McInnerny. Did not get to return until 30 years later in 2016 to see one of my own drama students perform and l also introduced many friends to the joys of the Fringe. My best moment was on the Craig Ferguson radio show which was on Rose Street being livestreamed to America. Got to chat to Craig and all his listeners about my love of drama, teaching drama and watching my students perform at the festival and then on Broadway."

Betsy Fowler

"Many years ago one August I emerged up the Waverley steps from the train station, blinking into the sunlight. What did I see in front of me but a unicycle chained to the nearest lamppost. A unicycle! It made me really chuckle and I’ve never forgotten it. For me it was the epitome of August in Edinburgh. Only during the Fringe!"

Jess Gioia

Previously, on #EdFringe

Wrestling with Vikings and picnics on trains;
Whisky with strangers and ukulele refrains;
Magic shows, Spiegeltents, comedy mime;
Dirty Dick’s, disco naps, losing track of the time;
Jazz, late-night burgers and a Space Hopper war;
Festival frolics and a jam-packed dancefloor;
The Beautiful People with the dirtiest looks;
Charlotte Square Gardens full of coffee and books;
The Writers’ Museum in Lady Stair’s Close,
Where words of the makars still linger like ghosts;
Those painful Fringe shows and those sheer delights,
Piano bar ladies and firework nights.

Lydia Crow

"In 1990 my partner's father became the Moderator of the Church of Scotland, so we were able to stay in the Moderator's flat in the Georgian House in Charlotte Square. The flat had lots of antique furniture and old paintings. My partner and I saw a wide range of events at the Festival, including the Footlights show. We returned to the flat late at night and had to be be very careful not to set off the burglar alarm in the Georgian House while we made our way up to the Moderator's flat."

Norma Frances Postin

"Edinburgh Fringe has been a highlight of our summer since we moved to Edinburgh in 2013, an opportunity for our whole family to indulge in culture and the arts together, to dip our toes into new experiences and deep dive into some familiar favourites. Come rain or shine, we pack our rucksacks and disappear into the crowd and into another world of magic and endless possibilities."

Julia Whitaker

"I came to the Fringe four years running with Vanessa, my oldest friend, travelling from my home in Preston to hers in Morpeth then on to Edinburgh together. The previous two months were full of emails back and forth between us as we excitedly scoured our separate programmes and city maps and narrowed down our choices, as many shows as we could cram into two-and-a-half days. The final spreadsheet was awesome! Vanessa is a tech wizard but she can't read maps so that was my job as we scooted between venues, and we only got lost once, when I completely missed the turning towards Pleasance and we ended up at Holyrood. Still made it to the show just in time to see the brilliant Lucy Porter. Best show from a not-so-well-known name was Tom Gill who had us in tears and guffaws with Growing Pains.

The 70th anniversary Fringe was great but we searched in vain for t-shirts or similar bearing that year's brilliant logo, especially as we both turned 70 that year. So the ever-resourceful Vanessa had it engraved on coasters at a stall in the big hall on the main street."

Celia Costello

"My memory fails me. I was there in 1948. I just remember wanting to sing in Princes Street Gardens but my great aunt didn’t approve! She was a very religious lady – church three times a day on Sunday. However I did enjoy the Scottish country dancing. I was 14 at the time."

Jenifer Herbert

"I first discovered the Fringe in 2015, thanks to an artist friend, Isabelle Georges, who was participating in the festival with her show Oh Là Là. Barely two hours after getting off the plane, I was at Assembly Checkpoint; then I discovered George Square Gardens and its incredible atmosphere. I discovered the energy, the sweetness of the festival. I walked Royal miles every day, handing out flyers, chatting to the artists I met; five days were enough for me to fall in love with Edinburgh and the Fringe. Since then, I've come back every year, for longer and longer, discovering wonderful artists and shows never seen elsewhere. One year I made friends with a French woman who worked at the ticket office and advised me on the shows to see; that year I saw 18 shows in 15 days. I laughed and was moved to tears. Those moments spent in Edinburgh and during the Fringe marked me for life, and I hope to return this year to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Festival."

Bruno Bazinet

"I had my hip replaced three years ago and attended the Fringe in an electric wheelchair. Everyone was being very accommodating and making space for me. We bumped into a performer dressed as a Mad Hatter riding a Segway. We chatted for a while, comparing our respective transport, then he asked, 'Want a race?' 'Sure thing,' I agreed. So we did – right in the middle of the road at George Square and everyone parted like the red sea."

Hilary Wells

"In the 1960s my parents used to take their brood of five children to the old Traverse. I remember sitting at the top of a high, dark, stepped construction somewhere in Edinburgh to watch entertaining plays. I now go to the much improved Traverse annually with my husband for food, drink and stimulating theatre (we particularly enjoy the Breakfast Plays)."

Sarah Miles

"Coming out of one of Mervyn Stutter's Pick of the Fringe shows I said, 'If Heaven isn't like the Fringe, I refuse to bother dying.'"

David Robinson

"We went to the Fringe for three days for our honeymoon 10 years ago. We were hooked and it was the start of our annual trip. We now go for 10 days every year and watch over 40 shows in that time."

Elizabeth Montgomery

"The Fringe is a frenzy of fun. We book shows from half-an-hour after we arrive to half-an-hour before we leave. Thirty-plus shows zap our senses, and just enjoying the city's outdoor beer tents, bars and coffee shops is amazing. We piled in for our fourth Improvised James Bond: Shaken not Stirred since we started coming in 2017. We sandwiched this in between Shakespeare for Breakfast and Murder She Didn't Write. Later we bumped into them in the street when they had plenty of time for a chat and posed for photos. Eventually we found some time for a sit and a drink, often dazed by the wit and skill of all the performers. The branding and design of the Fringe is also a delight as the city bursts with colour from venue names, banners and decoration of public areas."

John Crawley

A man stands on his head, while his head is in a bucket.

(c) David Baxter, 2011.

(c) David Baxter, 2011.

A street performer stands holding a guitar in the air by the neck.

(c) Anna Harries, 2014.

(c) Anna Harries, 2014.

A street performer pulls a face and holds up the peace sign.

(c) Anita Harries, 2014.

(c) Anita Harries, 2014.

A group of people pose for a photo, gathered around a table. At the front a performer holds up rock fingers.

(c) Maureen Polson, 2017. "At Massaoke 2017 with TJ, Catriona, Karen, Julie, Alan and John – with someone from the band jumping into the picture"

(c) Maureen Polson, 2017. "At Massaoke 2017 with TJ, Catriona, Karen, Julie, Alan and John – with someone from the band jumping into the picture"

A human statue interacts with a child, who wears his hat.

(c) Shona Melville, 2014. "We have taken my son to the Fringe since he was little and have seen some really interesting shows and street performances. He has grown with this and has become an artistic, musical and comedic child."

(c) Shona Melville, 2014. "We have taken my son to the Fringe since he was little and have seen some really interesting shows and street performances. He has grown with this and has become an artistic, musical and comedic child."

A performer in a purple jacket gestures into the air.

(c) Ken Campbell, 2006. "An enticing taste of the Fringe bursts open in the heart of Edinburgh as performers suddenly appear on the High Street to treat us to a dramatic moment from a play while nearby a sword swallower competes with a juggler for the crowd's attention. The High Street showcase is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy the flavour of the Fringe."

(c) Ken Campbell, 2006. "An enticing taste of the Fringe bursts open in the heart of Edinburgh as performers suddenly appear on the High Street to treat us to a dramatic moment from a play while nearby a sword swallower competes with a juggler for the crowd's attention. The High Street showcase is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy the flavour of the Fringe."

A woman sits next to Jayde Adams, who is holding a mic and looking at her.

(c) Gillian Hunt, 2017. "I am a huge Fringe fan and got to around 60 shows every year.  I mainly visit with two friends - Joanne and Margaret, and with my partner Laurence. One of my favourite Fringe memories is when I ended up on stage - with Jayde Adams in her 2017 show 'Jayded'  She was looking for a new best friend and she chose me to audition for the role!  She selected Joanne to film the audition, leaving Margaret and Laurence to laugh and cheer.  In the photo we are re-enacting a scene from Forrest Gump - the life is like a box of chocolates scene. What a giggle and a lovely memory."

(c) Gillian Hunt, 2017. "I am a huge Fringe fan and got to around 60 shows every year.  I mainly visit with two friends - Joanne and Margaret, and with my partner Laurence. One of my favourite Fringe memories is when I ended up on stage - with Jayde Adams in her 2017 show 'Jayded'  She was looking for a new best friend and she chose me to audition for the role!  She selected Joanne to film the audition, leaving Margaret and Laurence to laugh and cheer.  In the photo we are re-enacting a scene from Forrest Gump - the life is like a box of chocolates scene. What a giggle and a lovely memory."

Item 1 of 8
A man stands on his head, while his head is in a bucket.

(c) David Baxter, 2011.

(c) David Baxter, 2011.

A street performer stands holding a guitar in the air by the neck.

(c) Anna Harries, 2014.

(c) Anna Harries, 2014.

A street performer pulls a face and holds up the peace sign.

(c) Anita Harries, 2014.

(c) Anita Harries, 2014.

A group of people pose for a photo, gathered around a table. At the front a performer holds up rock fingers.

(c) Maureen Polson, 2017. "At Massaoke 2017 with TJ, Catriona, Karen, Julie, Alan and John – with someone from the band jumping into the picture"

(c) Maureen Polson, 2017. "At Massaoke 2017 with TJ, Catriona, Karen, Julie, Alan and John – with someone from the band jumping into the picture"

A human statue interacts with a child, who wears his hat.

(c) Shona Melville, 2014. "We have taken my son to the Fringe since he was little and have seen some really interesting shows and street performances. He has grown with this and has become an artistic, musical and comedic child."

(c) Shona Melville, 2014. "We have taken my son to the Fringe since he was little and have seen some really interesting shows and street performances. He has grown with this and has become an artistic, musical and comedic child."

A performer in a purple jacket gestures into the air.

(c) Ken Campbell, 2006. "An enticing taste of the Fringe bursts open in the heart of Edinburgh as performers suddenly appear on the High Street to treat us to a dramatic moment from a play while nearby a sword swallower competes with a juggler for the crowd's attention. The High Street showcase is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy the flavour of the Fringe."

(c) Ken Campbell, 2006. "An enticing taste of the Fringe bursts open in the heart of Edinburgh as performers suddenly appear on the High Street to treat us to a dramatic moment from a play while nearby a sword swallower competes with a juggler for the crowd's attention. The High Street showcase is a wonderful opportunity to enjoy the flavour of the Fringe."

A woman sits next to Jayde Adams, who is holding a mic and looking at her.

(c) Gillian Hunt, 2017. "I am a huge Fringe fan and got to around 60 shows every year.  I mainly visit with two friends - Joanne and Margaret, and with my partner Laurence. One of my favourite Fringe memories is when I ended up on stage - with Jayde Adams in her 2017 show 'Jayded'  She was looking for a new best friend and she chose me to audition for the role!  She selected Joanne to film the audition, leaving Margaret and Laurence to laugh and cheer.  In the photo we are re-enacting a scene from Forrest Gump - the life is like a box of chocolates scene. What a giggle and a lovely memory."

(c) Gillian Hunt, 2017. "I am a huge Fringe fan and got to around 60 shows every year.  I mainly visit with two friends - Joanne and Margaret, and with my partner Laurence. One of my favourite Fringe memories is when I ended up on stage - with Jayde Adams in her 2017 show 'Jayded'  She was looking for a new best friend and she chose me to audition for the role!  She selected Joanne to film the audition, leaving Margaret and Laurence to laugh and cheer.  In the photo we are re-enacting a scene from Forrest Gump - the life is like a box of chocolates scene. What a giggle and a lovely memory."

Memorable shows

"Fifty years ago when I was a pupil at James Gillespie’s School, we were taken to see a Fringe production of The Taming of the Shrew in a church hall nearby. It was acted as if it was the wild west and it was amazing! The energy, the actors, the acting. It opened my eyes to live theatre and how Shakespeare could be brought to life. I can still visualise it and is still one of the best productions I have ever seen."

Cynthia Phillips

"Most unusual Fringe event in my 36 years of attending: a Brecht play entirely in Serbo-Croatian. Twenty-six individual audience members were brought in covered in black hoods and, with hoods removed, placed in seats underneath the stage floor, heads poking up like cabbages. Actors painted gold walked or crawled about among us (fortunately without striking any heads). At the end, what appeared to be a car battery was placed in front of each of us and set alight. Then we were raised up from the floor by the actors and led outside to a large bonfire. I don’t believe anyone understood a thing about what we had experienced but the feeling shared was exhilaration! Regrettably the fire department closed the show after two or three performances."

Terry Andrews

"Around 2017 there was a leak in the roof at the Underbelly and water was dripping onto the stage area. Joe Lycett drew a massive penis with the water and his foot!"

Angus Kerr

"I am a hardcore Doug Anthony Allstars fan from Melbourne. I have been over to the Edinburgh Fringe seven times. When DAAS got back together in 2013 I was delighted. I followed them all around Australia. Imagine my excitement when they announced they were doing Edinburgh again! I was unemployed at the time and could not afford to go over and vowed I would go if they ever went back. In 2016 my friend and I attended every UK gig. Every night we lined up an hour before for the prized front row at the Pleasance. Tim Ferguson was an absolute inspiration, performing from a wheelchair (he lives with MS), Paul McDermott with sublime vocals and Paul Livingston (Flacco) just delightful. I got to meet up with Jess and Colm from Ireland that I knew from the fan club. I will be forever grateful to Al Murray who made this all happen. Also a mad DAAS fan, he funded their return. Just amazing. A high point was when Mervyn Stutter burst in to award DAAS the Spirit of The Fringe award. The return to Edinburgh featured on the second half of Tick Fucking Tock a documentary for the Australian Broadcasting Commission. DAAS also returned in 2017 – and so did I! Again the reception was enthusiastic and ended in standing ovations. Edinburgh Fringe is the most amazing festival in the world. I love and miss everything about it! I have lots more stories but this is the story of the Doug Anthony Allstars, the greatest comedy outfit in history."

Kristy Shields

"Many of my most extraordinary Fringe moments are thanks to the legendary Richard Demarco, who brought so much art and theatre from behind what was then the Iron Curtain. In 1987, when he had a building in Blackfriars Street, there was a show called Tattoo (Tetovirano Pozoriste) from the Open Stage Obala theatre company of Sarajevo in what was then Yugoslavia, now Bosnia and Herzegovina. The entrancing, wordless show involved a struggling young couple and a large beautiful rabbit, and was staged all over the building. But what was really extraordinary was that at one point the audience was divided into men and women; the men saw one scene and the women saw another and neither ever saw what the other group had seen. I've never seen that done before or since. You can imagine the furious conversations that followed! The show was written and directed by Mladen Materic who has since gone on to a big career as writer and director."

Robert Dawson Scott

"I will always remember being at the Fringe in August 2011 for my 57th birthday. I had a delicious lunch at Wedgwood before sitting front and center to see David Sedaris on a rainy night. Then I took a cab back to my hotel serenaded with Barry Manilow songs by the cabbie. He did not know I’m not a Manilow fan at all!"

Heather McCune

"I attended the 2017 Fringe. Having done the local Hollywood Fringe Festival in Los Angeles, I knew to maximise my experience by perusing the online programmein advance and getting tickets to productions that looked interesting so that I could spend my time seeing shows instead of figuring out what to see.

"One such show was The Chamber Pot Opera. It was presented by a troupe from Australia and I vaguely remembered that it was a pastiche made up of famous arias tied together with a new plot. What I didn't retain was that there was a reason it embraced the concept of a chamber pot – it's set in a loo!

"The experience started off uniquely enough as the small audience (maybe 15 people) gathered in the hallway and were then led to the ladies room. All of us had a clear view of the sinks and stalls, with a keyboard player to our right. The music began and the three singers swept into room singing beautifully, and we were all swept away. Who knew that the acoustics of the restroom were perfect for opera!

"Given the intimate seating arrangement, I kept looking over at the men standing next to me as we pinched ourselves to be so fortunate to be witnessing this magic unfolding before us."

Scott GG Haller

"First poster saw on arrival was for the Strictly show. Not usually interested in ballroom dancing but thought, what the heck, do something different. Enjoyed it so much went back on Tuesday before heading home. It was my birthday after all."

Barbara Warren

"I went to see Drunk Shakespeare with only the Fringe guide's description as a starting point. What a premise, what a great show! The cast was very patient with the drunk actor that went through a loop of the same lines three times while trying to disarm him of the the stage sword. While still in Edinburgh, I was raving about it to anyone and everyone that listened, telling them they had to see it. A few years later, I saw a sign in mid-town Manhattan (NYC) for Drunk Shakespeare. And again I was raving to my companions about what a funny and unexpected show I'd seen at the Fringe."

Stephanie Clark

"In 2004, I saw two guys on the Royal Mile dressed in death-metal leather, studs and long hair, playing metal on the mandolin and ukulele. Sounding different though very original and very good fun. Truly a different approach."

Tom Davidson

"Went on a Boogie Shoes Scottish Special Disco walk. The most fun I've ever had with my favourite Scottish sounds in my ears, and fun jokes and commentary from our amazing host Boogie Roo. Walking around the city with everyone taking pictures and joining in, even though they could not hear the music."

Ravinder Takher

"At the Fringe in 2003, we had just finished seeing a late show at the Caves when we were handed free tickets for a show called Flight of the Conchords starting near midnight. These two guys with guitars from New Zealand were singing original songs and telling jokes in the cave next door. They were great. HBO thought so, too, and they were on TV for a season or two. We were sad when they declined to keep it going."

Greg Moser

"We’ve been coming to the Fringe since the late 90s and over the years, have amassed many standout moments. My favourite is probably when I ended up as a bottle of tequila at Puddles' Pity Party in 2015. Having been singled out as his latest victim, Puddles led me to the stage, dropped a rather heavy costume over my head and proceeded to serenade me in Spanish as the audience howled with laughter. The problem was, I had no idea what I was supposed to be! The costume kept falling over my eyes, so all I could make out was a bit of yellow and red. I was relieved when the song came to an end and eagerly waited to be set free. But it wasn’t meant to be – I was made to walk back to my seat in full costume, which is how I had to stay for the rest of the show. It was then, still unsure of what I actually was, that I turned to my husband and whispered, 'Howard, am I a chicken?!'"

Pauline Frear

"My first Fringe was in 1974. Tickets for many shows were less than 50p; I went to about five a day. Sometimes there were more people on the stage than in the audience. One of my favourite Fringe shows was Macbeth for two actors and five teddy bears."

Carola

"We bought the £5 ticket of a lifetime at the Fringe. We had booked tickets to some big-name shows. As you do at the Fringe we also bought a random £5-each pair of tickets to Bill Clinton – The Musical from the kiosk just a few minutes before the show started. I can't tell you how many tens of years ago that was, but we still talk and laugh about it. It was the funniest piece of theatre I have ever seen to this day."

Lynne Rushworth

"Jo Brand came onstage at the Gilded Balloon, pint glass in hand, and said, “I’m pissed and can’t remember my set so you will just have to heckle for ten minutes”. Someone shouted, 'You fat cow,' and she replied, 'That’s original... next!'"

Elaine Davies

"It was the late '80s and the (now late) great comedian Pete McCarthy was doing a one-man show, Live in Your Living Room, which he performed in people's bedrooms, bathrooms and living rooms to audiences of up to 20 people. It focused on the worst effects of a hangover. The show began with an apparently hungover Pete in bed, surrounded by empty bottles. It transferred to the living room where, sporting a revolting stretch fabric outfit, he threatened to strip before changing his mind. Meanwhile he was delivering a side-splitting monologue which developed from the perils of drinking to tragicomic stuff about loneliness, death and unrequited love.

"My flat wasn’t big enough, so a friend hosted Pete’s show for an audience of about 20. The excitement of having him perform live in your flat was hard to beat! At the end, he left us with a (VHS) video to play in which he instructed the host to meet him at the local phone box (no mobile phones back then!), hand over the money and return the video – he was extremely trusting! And we were left in stitches."

Jan McLardy

"My first Fringe, late 80s, I saw New Zealand-based Dramadillo playing Homer's Odyssey with two actors and a musician. They obviously had to play multiple roles, and even contrived to swap which actor played which part *in the middle of a scene* and still keep us with them. Quite astonishing."

Peter Hancock

"The room was heavy with expectation as Richard Gadd came onstage. Earlier that day he had received the Best Show award for 2016. The resultant exultant mood helped energise Gadd to deliver one final performance of Monkey See Monkey Do. A breathtaking show; in Gadd's case, on a treadmill throughout.

"The show itself was an exploration of the fear, shame and self-doubt that resulted from sexual abuse. Making brilliant use of video and voiceover, Gadd created an impressively immersive experience. This final performance was one of mesmeric brilliance.

"Gadd's win brought prestige to the PBH Free Fringe, and also countered the accusation that local performers cannot make an impact (Gadd being from Fife). Gadd’s view that 'the Fringe is a magical place… don’t let anyone tell you otherwise' was clearly demonstrated that night. The standing ovation of over 10 minutes was fully merited.

"Gadd's performance has stayed with me since and exemplifies why I and thousands of others return to the Fringe year after year."

Charlie Ellis

"Have lots of good memories, though remember I saw a play called The Room in 2019 which was fantastic. Anyway I decided to put in a good review but had forgot the girl's name who starred in it. As I was walking down the Royal Mile next day trying to remember I more or less walked into a girl who offered me a flyer for her show, yes you guessed it the same girl from the show so I was happy to let her know that I had really enjoyed the show and she was very grateful for the feedback."

David

"One of my fondest memories ever was getting to see Rose Matafeo’s original Horndog run and then, a year later, standing directly behind her in the queue for coffee just before she was about to do a special encore run of that same show. And now she’s only gone and got herself an HBO special and an internationally loved show on television!"

Tali Cargill

"As the 1977 Fringe began, I picked up the buzz that there was a fantastic new play on at Carlton Studios. I bought tickets and we saw Writer’s Cramp – the first play by John Byrne which turned out to become the hit at that year’s Fringe. It was hysterically funny, and for John Byrne, it immediately established him as a star playwright, going on to write the Slab Boys trilogy.

"John Byrne recalled the background to this production at the 2011 Lennoxlove Book Festival. The play had been last minute and they called in on Alistair Moffat, then Fringe Director, to try and get an entry in the programme. He sent them down to Calton Studios which was being refurbished and they thought it would be fine for the performance. The Council's safety inspector wasn’t sure whether the building was suitable as it apparently lacked suitable fire escapes, but they told him that ‘they were unlikely to get much of an audience’ – which he accepted.

"Postscript: On our return from the Lennoxlove Book Festival we caught up with another couple for dinner. The male had been a senior planning officer at Edinburgh City Council. We told him the funny story about Calton Studios, and he told us that he was pretty sure that the junior 1977 official that let the venue be used for the production, despite the fire escapes not being up to standard, had been… him!"

Ian Ritchie

Four people stand in front of a curtain doing the conga with headdresses and tights on.

(c) Mary Church, 1980/81. "Back in 1980 or '81 we junior doctors from Glasgow Royal Infirmary took our Christmas show to the Fringe. Somehow we were sold out! The public’s appetite for a medical anything is insatiable. All of us mad and tired but clearly supremely hardworking doctors. What fun we had. Sometimes staying overnight on someone’s floor or driving to Edinburgh furiously from the wards to perform each night for two weeks... Our subsequent three shows were pretty good too, but nothing matched the exhilaration and unexpected success of the first one. Everyone in the show has gone on to greater things in medicine; professors, researchers, consultants, BMA negotiators. High achievers all but none in the entertainment industry."

(c) Mary Church, 1980/81. "Back in 1980 or '81 we junior doctors from Glasgow Royal Infirmary took our Christmas show to the Fringe. Somehow we were sold out! The public’s appetite for a medical anything is insatiable. All of us mad and tired but clearly supremely hardworking doctors. What fun we had. Sometimes staying overnight on someone’s floor or driving to Edinburgh furiously from the wards to perform each night for two weeks... Our subsequent three shows were pretty good too, but nothing matched the exhilaration and unexpected success of the first one. Everyone in the show has gone on to greater things in medicine; professors, researchers, consultants, BMA negotiators. High achievers all but none in the entertainment industry."

A couple sit on a couch smiling at the camera, wearing glow sticks.

(c) Caroline Ferguson, 2018. "So my husband and I spend a week at the Fringe nearly every year with my parents who are now in their 70s. We took them to see Trainspotting at the EICC in 2018, not quite realising how immersive the production would be, and certainly not expecting to either be part of a race or get poop landing in their cider! Needless to say, they had an amazing time and took the whole thing in their stride, including the rave!"

(c) Caroline Ferguson, 2018. "So my husband and I spend a week at the Fringe nearly every year with my parents who are now in their 70s. We took them to see Trainspotting at the EICC in 2018, not quite realising how immersive the production would be, and certainly not expecting to either be part of a race or get poop landing in their cider! Needless to say, they had an amazing time and took the whole thing in their stride, including the rave!"

A naked performer wears two signs to cover their body. The signs read 'it doesn't have to be' and 'the end'.

(c) Mark Sutherland. "My first visit to the Edinburgh Fringe was unforgettable! Especially thanks to Betty Grumble – this sex clown was set to save the world! The show had everything – live singing, performance art, commentary on climate change and lip-syncing (using both sets of lips no less!). I had to get the t-shirt and still wear it everywhere six years later!"

(c) Mark Sutherland. "My first visit to the Edinburgh Fringe was unforgettable! Especially thanks to Betty Grumble – this sex clown was set to save the world! The show had everything – live singing, performance art, commentary on climate change and lip-syncing (using both sets of lips no less!). I had to get the t-shirt and still wear it everywhere six years later!"

A drag queen with green hair and a beard wears a giant hat on stage.

(c) Gordon mc Dougall, 2020. “My wife and I started going to the Fringe just to see what it was like. First time we only went for one night and stayed in a bed and breakfast. We now go for four night and five days and stay right next to some of the main event venues. When it was cancelled due to Covid we still came up to support the city; then last year with a limited programme we were there and enjoyed it. See photo for drag acts from Castle Terrace car park last year.”

(c) Gordon mc Dougall, 2020. “My wife and I started going to the Fringe just to see what it was like. First time we only went for one night and stayed in a bed and breakfast. We now go for four night and five days and stay right next to some of the main event venues. When it was cancelled due to Covid we still came up to support the city; then last year with a limited programme we were there and enjoyed it. See photo for drag acts from Castle Terrace car park last year.”

Two smiling friends pose for a photo wearing hats and standing in front of microphones.

(c) Debbie, 2018. "We have been coming to the Fringe since 2015 with a group of friends. We always go to see the amazing Edinburgh Renaissance Band (hope they’re still going!) and this was an American-style whodunnit play which was on at the same venue in2018. After the show, we were allowed to try out the props (oh the freedom of those pre-Covid days…!) This is me and my friend Jacqui."

(c) Debbie, 2018. "We have been coming to the Fringe since 2015 with a group of friends. We always go to see the amazing Edinburgh Renaissance Band (hope they’re still going!) and this was an American-style whodunnit play which was on at the same venue in2018. After the show, we were allowed to try out the props (oh the freedom of those pre-Covid days…!) This is me and my friend Jacqui."

Item 1 of 6
Four people stand in front of a curtain doing the conga with headdresses and tights on.

(c) Mary Church, 1980/81. "Back in 1980 or '81 we junior doctors from Glasgow Royal Infirmary took our Christmas show to the Fringe. Somehow we were sold out! The public’s appetite for a medical anything is insatiable. All of us mad and tired but clearly supremely hardworking doctors. What fun we had. Sometimes staying overnight on someone’s floor or driving to Edinburgh furiously from the wards to perform each night for two weeks... Our subsequent three shows were pretty good too, but nothing matched the exhilaration and unexpected success of the first one. Everyone in the show has gone on to greater things in medicine; professors, researchers, consultants, BMA negotiators. High achievers all but none in the entertainment industry."

(c) Mary Church, 1980/81. "Back in 1980 or '81 we junior doctors from Glasgow Royal Infirmary took our Christmas show to the Fringe. Somehow we were sold out! The public’s appetite for a medical anything is insatiable. All of us mad and tired but clearly supremely hardworking doctors. What fun we had. Sometimes staying overnight on someone’s floor or driving to Edinburgh furiously from the wards to perform each night for two weeks... Our subsequent three shows were pretty good too, but nothing matched the exhilaration and unexpected success of the first one. Everyone in the show has gone on to greater things in medicine; professors, researchers, consultants, BMA negotiators. High achievers all but none in the entertainment industry."

A couple sit on a couch smiling at the camera, wearing glow sticks.

(c) Caroline Ferguson, 2018. "So my husband and I spend a week at the Fringe nearly every year with my parents who are now in their 70s. We took them to see Trainspotting at the EICC in 2018, not quite realising how immersive the production would be, and certainly not expecting to either be part of a race or get poop landing in their cider! Needless to say, they had an amazing time and took the whole thing in their stride, including the rave!"

(c) Caroline Ferguson, 2018. "So my husband and I spend a week at the Fringe nearly every year with my parents who are now in their 70s. We took them to see Trainspotting at the EICC in 2018, not quite realising how immersive the production would be, and certainly not expecting to either be part of a race or get poop landing in their cider! Needless to say, they had an amazing time and took the whole thing in their stride, including the rave!"

A naked performer wears two signs to cover their body. The signs read 'it doesn't have to be' and 'the end'.

(c) Mark Sutherland. "My first visit to the Edinburgh Fringe was unforgettable! Especially thanks to Betty Grumble – this sex clown was set to save the world! The show had everything – live singing, performance art, commentary on climate change and lip-syncing (using both sets of lips no less!). I had to get the t-shirt and still wear it everywhere six years later!"

(c) Mark Sutherland. "My first visit to the Edinburgh Fringe was unforgettable! Especially thanks to Betty Grumble – this sex clown was set to save the world! The show had everything – live singing, performance art, commentary on climate change and lip-syncing (using both sets of lips no less!). I had to get the t-shirt and still wear it everywhere six years later!"

A drag queen with green hair and a beard wears a giant hat on stage.

(c) Gordon mc Dougall, 2020. “My wife and I started going to the Fringe just to see what it was like. First time we only went for one night and stayed in a bed and breakfast. We now go for four night and five days and stay right next to some of the main event venues. When it was cancelled due to Covid we still came up to support the city; then last year with a limited programme we were there and enjoyed it. See photo for drag acts from Castle Terrace car park last year.”

(c) Gordon mc Dougall, 2020. “My wife and I started going to the Fringe just to see what it was like. First time we only went for one night and stayed in a bed and breakfast. We now go for four night and five days and stay right next to some of the main event venues. When it was cancelled due to Covid we still came up to support the city; then last year with a limited programme we were there and enjoyed it. See photo for drag acts from Castle Terrace car park last year.”

Two smiling friends pose for a photo wearing hats and standing in front of microphones.

(c) Debbie, 2018. "We have been coming to the Fringe since 2015 with a group of friends. We always go to see the amazing Edinburgh Renaissance Band (hope they’re still going!) and this was an American-style whodunnit play which was on at the same venue in2018. After the show, we were allowed to try out the props (oh the freedom of those pre-Covid days…!) This is me and my friend Jacqui."

(c) Debbie, 2018. "We have been coming to the Fringe since 2015 with a group of friends. We always go to see the amazing Edinburgh Renaissance Band (hope they’re still going!) and this was an American-style whodunnit play which was on at the same venue in2018. After the show, we were allowed to try out the props (oh the freedom of those pre-Covid days…!) This is me and my friend Jacqui."

Love at the Fringe

"In 2003 I saw an advert looking for volunteers to come and run a venue for three weeks (accommodation and meals provided). Working in the arts it was the perfect opportunity to visit and experience the Fringe.

"Whilst here I met a guy who was working at the same venue, we hit it off... 19 years later we are married, have two girls, two cats and we both work in the arts and cultural sector in Edinburgh.

"I would just like to say thank you to the Fringe for positively changing my life."

Ms Sharon May

"In 1993, I was performing in Pleasance Two with The Shoestring Players. My then-girlfriend, Jen, planned to come visit us during the middle week. Only a few weeks previously, a student of mine asked if I was going to propose to Jen while over there. I hadn't thought about it too much but knew it was eventually going to happen; so, why not propose under a castle? After our performance on August 17, I told Jen I wanted to show her the Princes Street Gardens. We made our way to the Ross Fountain, pre-renovation in all of its golden bronze splendor. We stepped over the short guard rail and sat on the edge of the fountain. I drew her attention up castle rock to look at an imaginary distraction, and as she looked, I got down on my knee. Looking back she exclaimed, 'What are you doing?!' I, of course, proposed, she said yes, and we hugged and kissed. The kiss, however, was interrupted by a friendly policeman who informed us, 'Yer no supposed to be past the rail.' We sheepishly retreated to the proper side, and began our lives together."

Michael Calderone

"About seven years ago I climbed up to the Lawnmarket at 9.30pm to join the crowds waiting for the Tattoo performers to come marching down Castlehill. The stewards cleared a path through the crowd to make way for a horse box. Before the procession arrived, a young man ran into the cleared space and, holding his girlfriend's hand, called out to the crowd 'my girlfriend and I have had a fantastic time in Edinburgh during the Fringe and I want us to be together always'. He then dropped on his knee in the middle of the Lawnmarket and asked her to marry him.

"The girl was clearly surprised but after a moment's hesitation, she squealed with delight, said 'yes' and flung her arms around his neck. At that very moment, there was a tremendous burst of fireworks from the Tattoo, the night sky was lit up and the crowd burst into applause!

"Hollywood could not have planned it better."

Bill Metcalfe

"We planned to get married in 2008. When we were at the 2007 Fringe, we saw a musical trio called Pluck on the High Street and loved it. They said they mostly did corporate gigs or shows like the Fringe so we didn’t think they would do a little wedding but in 2008, just before the big day, they got in touch and we were delighted to have them perform in our little village hall wedding. A perfect day!"

Alex Allan

"We have attended the Fringe every year since 1998 and it is something of an obsession for us. So much so that we decided to get married there... in secret.

"My five-year-old boy, Stanley, was my best man, and the witnesses were random Fringe-goers we dragged in off the Royal Mile (some pensioners from Fife – one of them had a kazoo and played the 'Wedding March' as we walked in!) As we took our vows a street performer was juggling flaming chainsaws outside the window... perfect!

"We have brought our son along since he was born and he is now 17 and a successful amateur actor, hoping to one day soon appear at the Fringe himself as a performer."

Richard Brown

A father and son wear a wig and a shower cap while standing on a stage with a performer.

(c) Sue Seferian, 2015. "For two years we hung out in Edinburgh during the Fringe and took our young son to shows to keep him busy. While we never succeeded in lighting the flame of his thespian career, we had lots of laughs interacting with some of our favourite groups. Our son and his dad gave an impromptu performance in a kids' show in a shipping container. So many happy memories spent in Edinburgh – can't wait to finally return this year!!!"

(c) Sue Seferian, 2015. "For two years we hung out in Edinburgh during the Fringe and took our young son to shows to keep him busy. While we never succeeded in lighting the flame of his thespian career, we had lots of laughs interacting with some of our favourite groups. Our son and his dad gave an impromptu performance in a kids' show in a shipping container. So many happy memories spent in Edinburgh – can't wait to finally return this year!!!"

A group of women wear bras over their t-shirts and stand on the high street with flyers.

(c) Elicit Theatre, 2015. "The Elicit Theatre cast has attended the Edinburgh Fringe in 2015, '16 and '17. We performed for the whole of the festival and saw loads of fantastic shows! We performed Femmetamorphisis, a diverse comedy which has also toured London, about relationships, rum punch and lingerie. We even got broadcast on BBC Radio, which was great!"

(c) Elicit Theatre, 2015. "The Elicit Theatre cast has attended the Edinburgh Fringe in 2015, '16 and '17. We performed for the whole of the festival and saw loads of fantastic shows! We performed Femmetamorphisis, a diverse comedy which has also toured London, about relationships, rum punch and lingerie. We even got broadcast on BBC Radio, which was great!"

A dark photo of someone standing in a spotlight.

(c) Nick Hennigan, 1992. "As a working-class kid from Birmingham, born and brought up on a council estate and who left school at 15 with no qualifications, I'd never really got Shakespeare – so my notion to write a more accessible version of Shakespeare’s Henry V (I’d seen a film on TV) for one person was mad! But I did write it and performed it for one night at the Mac, Birmingham. I thought everyone was running out at the end, but it was a standing ovation! In the bar afterward I was approached by a stranger – who turned out to be the then manager of Jasper Carrott – who said he'd like to take us to the Fringe. I had no idea what the Fringe was, but said yes anyway. The Festival COMPLETELY blew me away. Every space becomes a performance space. We got great reviews, but more importantly, I couldn't believe there was nothing like the Fringe in Birmingham, Britain's Second City! I was so blown away by what I saw in Edinburgh, I came back to Birmingham and established the first professional fringe pub theatre company, which gave rise to a whole new range of informal venues in the West Midlands and changed the whole artistic landscape. I’ve written and directed many plays since and won many awards. Oh, and my original play, Henry V – Lion of England, traveled the world! All thanks to the Fringe!"

(c) Nick Hennigan, 1992. "As a working-class kid from Birmingham, born and brought up on a council estate and who left school at 15 with no qualifications, I'd never really got Shakespeare – so my notion to write a more accessible version of Shakespeare’s Henry V (I’d seen a film on TV) for one person was mad! But I did write it and performed it for one night at the Mac, Birmingham. I thought everyone was running out at the end, but it was a standing ovation! In the bar afterward I was approached by a stranger – who turned out to be the then manager of Jasper Carrott – who said he'd like to take us to the Fringe. I had no idea what the Fringe was, but said yes anyway. The Festival COMPLETELY blew me away. Every space becomes a performance space. We got great reviews, but more importantly, I couldn't believe there was nothing like the Fringe in Birmingham, Britain's Second City! I was so blown away by what I saw in Edinburgh, I came back to Birmingham and established the first professional fringe pub theatre company, which gave rise to a whole new range of informal venues in the West Midlands and changed the whole artistic landscape. I’ve written and directed many plays since and won many awards. Oh, and my original play, Henry V – Lion of England, traveled the world! All thanks to the Fringe!"